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Links to Short Stories around the Interwebs

Here's a recommendation from our friends over at the Translated SF Wiki (you should check them out if you have an interest in non-UK/US SF!) 

Anton Stark's short story Silkstrand, A Minute Of is a fascinating little fragment, set in Chinese-style high culture, and following one of the characters responsible for maintaining the universal clock that keeps the Empire ticking, and time flowing correctly. But who, by chance, finds out that - no, I'm not telling. Go read it, it's short, it's clever, and it's charming. 

The story was published, both as text and as a Podcast on Cast of Wonders - links below.

The picture on the right is a wooden Triangle Mandala - it felt somewhat appropriate given the subject matter!

 

Links: Silkstrand, A Minute Of - Cast of Wonders - Anton Stark - Translated SF

 

Elana Gomel - Where the Streets Have No NameElana Gomel came to my attention first with her magnificent story Going East in Rachel Swirsky & Sean Wallace 's collection People Of The Book: A Decade of Jewish Science Fiction & Fantasy.

She has since published 3 novels, a collection, and loads of short fiction - expect a few pointers to short stories to come your way here, or maybe even a full review as and when I get to do one!

Here's Where the Streets Have No Name - a story, based on a quite standard trope, but with a rather unusual, claustrophobic treatment as we follow the crew of a commercial start-up desperately trying to make contact with the inhabitants of Gliese 512, who have roundly ignored their presence so far. But, as you could have guessed, there is more to this than meets the eye (and remote drones deployed), of course.

Read it all at the link below - the image on the right is by the digital artist Alex Andreev, and is not connected to the story except in my head. Go check out his site, I think his work rather impressive!

Links: Elana Gomel - Where the Streets Have No Name - People Of The Book - Alex Andreev

 

Erinn L. Kemper - The SongErinn L Kemper is a Canadian Horror writer living in the Carribean, with a number of published short stories to her name.

The Song is not something I would have rated as horror, but rather as desolate and dystopian; but I can see how you could arrive at that definition when coming from the other direction, so to speak. It is set on a former oil rig now serving as a whale farming and research station, and follows a change in behaviour of the whales, and associated changes to their songs.

It is, I'm sure to no surprise, not entirely cheerful, and for me had both echoes of Somtow Sucharitkul's Starship and Haiku and, to a lesser degree, of Peter Watt's Bulk Food. But judge yourself, the link is below and on the right - it's worth your time!

Norwegian-based High North Alliance claims the carbon footprint resulting from eating whale meat is substantially lower than that of beef. One serving of whale meat contains 181% of your daily intake of iron, and 55% of your daily intake of B12. It is low in fat and cholesterol. As of 2010, fluke meat cost up to two hundred dollars per kilogram, more than triple the price of belly meat.

—Dr. Suzanne Anderson, How Do You Like Your Whale?

The illustration on the right is by Mary Haasdyk

Links: Erinn L. Kemper - The Song - Starship and Haiku - Bulk Food - Mary Haasdyk

 

It's been quiet here, I know. The tumbleweed has come, and buggered off again.

Me, I had COVID in early spring. Not too bad, as illnesses go, in my case. But it knocked me sideways, in some way. Between long COVID, work stress (I work in healthcare), and the general political clusterfuck on both sides of the Atlantic I have been left in a state, where I have not read a book, never mind written about one, in 9 months now. 

I have, fresh of the press, Neal Asher's Lockdown Tales sitting in front of me. Maybe some topical short stories from a writer I really enjoy will help me get back in the saddle? Here's to hope...

Meanwhile, I'd like to point you to two efforts that came out of the COVID disruption and lockdowns, both entitled Decameron, for reasons all too transparent.

First out of the gate, simply because I host it, is this collection by friends, acquaintances, and others struggling to make sense of this new world order: Decameron: Storytelling in the Time of the Pandemic

And secondly, in a much bigger, much more professional, and in large part financially driven (half/half to the authors and a charitable organisation) way, the Jo Walton-curated New Decameron (you need to be a Patron to read most of it. Best spent 1$ of your life I reckon).

But, especially, Peter Watts' contribution, The Last of the Redmond Billionaires

Look after yourself. Be kind, to yourself and others. Be safe. Together we've got this.

 

Earlier this year the latest installment of the Pan-African science fiction anthology AfroSFv3, edited by Ivor W Hartmann, was released.

To whet the appetite we are given free access to the short story Njuzu by  Zimbabwean author TL Huchu from it;  interweaving traditionally SF vocabulary and setting about an accident on a mining colony on Ceres with Shona mythology to dazzling effect. Telling from this freebie in the Johannesburg Review of Books I reckon that  we are in for a treat with the collection!

AfroSFv3 Author Spotlight: T.L. Huchu’s work has appeared in Interzone, The Apex Book of World SF 5, Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine, The Year's Best Crime and Mystery Stories 2016, AfroSFv1, and elsewhere. He enjoys working across genres, from crime to sci-fi to literary fiction. Currently, he is working on new fantasy novel. Find him @TendaiHuchu

Links: TL Huchu - Njuzu - Johannesburg Review of Books - AfroSFv3

  

 

Peter Watts - Blindsight

 

Sydney Padua - The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage


Andy Weir - The Martian

 

Thomas Pynchon – Gravity’s Rainbow

 

Doris Lessing - Shikasta

 

Thomas Pynchon - Slow Learner

 

Somtow Sucharitul – Starship & Haiku

 

Iain Sinclair - Radon Daughters

 

Doris Lessing – The Sirian Experiments

 

Peter Watts – Maelstrom

 

Tricia Sullivan – Occupy Me

 

Aliette de Bodard – In the Vanishers’ Palace

 

Charles Stross - The Atrocity Archives

 

Ian Sales – Adrift on the Sea of Rains

 

S.P. Somtow – I Wake from a Dream of a Drowned Star City

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